res•tive

adjective — [res-tiv]

definition: (of a person) unable to keep still or silent and becoming increasingly difficult to control, esp. because of impatience, dissatisfaction, or boredom.

example usage:

Our creation in the image of God makes the human spirit restive in the middle of this substitute paradise we call the West. Indeed, as Augustine once observed, it is restless until it finds rest in God who made it. The story of the West, in many ways, is also the story of this restiveness.

David Wells, The Courage to Be Protestant, 108

Email Forwards

Update – August 24 at 11:23AM: Read the following and thought it was good supplemental wisdom.

Let me speak for everyone you have ever met, from a recent acquaintance to your closest relative: We can wait until you get home to see the photos from your vacation. You can share the funny anecdote about your kids after they’ve gone to bed. And nothing you’ve ever tweeted or shared is urgent enough for you do it while driving.

Pull Over Before You Read This, Confession #79 from Tweetage Wasteland

Hyper-busyness

Six Lessons in Prayer


This highly-recommended message is by Alexander Strauch, originally preached during chapel at The Master’s Seminary on April 16, 2009.

Strauch addresses the (pastoral) idol of hyper-busyness, and how that challenges the apostolic priorities in Acts 6:4: “We will devote ourselves to prayer and the ministry of the word.”

From Ephesians 6:18-19, Strauch admonishes pastors to:

  1. Always be creative in your praying: “all prayer and supplication.” Avoid the rut.
  2. Always be praying in a spirit of prayer: “praying at all times.” Emphasis on the frequency, thanking always, confessing regularly, seeking always.
  3. Always be praying in the power of the Spirit: “praying … in the Spirit.”
  4. Always be watching and praying. Emphasis on effort and perseverance: “keep alert with all perseverance.”
  5. Always be praying for others: “making supplication for all the saints.” See also 1 Samuel 12:23
  6. Always be praying for missionaries and the gospel: “to proclaim the mystery of the gospel.”

des•ul•to•ry

adjective — [des-uhl-tawr-ee]

definition: lacking a plan, purpose, or enthusiasm

It is true that some traditional churches are desultory, dispirited, boring, dull, lifeless, inept, small, disheartened, or otherwise dying. One does wonder, though, why such a dead dog keeps getting kicked, sometimes quite viciously, by the church marketers.

David Wells, The Courage to Be Protestant, 39

Diagramming for sake of genuine textual exposition

  1. Since mankind, in general, is innately hopeless and helpless in reference to his own spiritual reformation or advancement,
  2. and since sinners suffer from hamartiological (sin) hangover,
  3. and since God’s Word is often associated with His power, especially in overcoming the problems of sin,
  4. and since “the Christian preacher…is a herald” of God’s powerful Word,

THEN the most consistent, divinely attested way for making full proof of our ministry is through a life-long activity in genuine textual exposition from the whole counsel of God as we humbly submit ourselves and the results to the sovereign Spirit.

George Zemek, “Grammatical Analysis and Expository Preaching,” Rediscovering Expository Preaching, 105-106