The Magician’s Nephew

5 of 5 stars to The Magician’s Nephew by C.S. Lewis

2018: It is so goosebump inducing to read this as the sixth book, as it was in publication order, rather than to read it as the first book, which it is in Narnian chronology. The creation account, while different from the actual creation account of our world in many ways, really sings. We’re also reminded that for those who love Aslan, Aslan loves those we love who are suffering even more than we love them.


2010: Still making my way through all seven Chronicles, six down now. So many good things in this one; choked up multiple times in the last few pages.

The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment

5 of 5 stars to The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment by Jeremiah Burroughs

I started reading this with my 5th-6th grade Bible class last school year, but we didn’t finish it. I started over when summer break began, then got sidetracked a couple times. Then I committed to plodding at two pages per day and it was a fantastic kick in the contentment pants every day. Though brief, it’s not really a book to read in a week, any more than one wants to take a month’s worth of antibiotic pills in one gulp. Highly recommended, especially if you’re ready to be reminded how foul a discontented heart really is.

The Odyssey

4 of 5 stars to The Odyssey by Homer

Read this again in 2018 with the Omnibus Tenebras group. I’m doubling my previous star rating, and adding that this time I grew in admiration for Odysseus and Penelope, for a story of glory in fighting for marriage and family rather than glory in circuitous fighting as in The Iliad. Good work, Homer.


2012: 2 of 5 stars. I’m glad that I read it. Finally. However, I can’t say that (I’ve grown so much that I’m at the point where) epic Greek poetry suits me. That said, it wasn’t as bad as having Polyphemus bash my brains out on the floor, so I have much to be thankful for.

The Horse and His Boy

Upping my star count from 4 (in 2010) to 5 of 5 (in 2018) for The Horse and His Boy by C.S. Lewis.

Good stuff about Aslan’s protective, and sometimes painful, providence. Also a story of two princes: one who transitioned from a slave boy to a royal leader, the other who transformed from a royal jerk into an actual ass.


Also read in 2010. Is it okay to get this excited every time Aslan shows?

Head Covering: A Forgotten Christian Practice for Modern Times

5 of 5 stars to Head Covering: A Forgotten Christian Practice for Modern Times by Jeremy Gardiner

I’m preaching through 1 Corinthians 11 and saw a positive review of this book on FB. The author’s conclusion is obvious from the title of the book, and the fact that he started the Head Covering Movement is also a give-away.

Surprising to me, I really enjoyed the book. I appreciated the exegesis he presented, the tone he took, and the resources he cited. He made a very compelling case, and, if I were to change my position, it would be in his direction. I could see his point from the passage about it being right for women in every age and culture to wear a cloth covering on their heads when involved in praying and prophesying.

If you are interested, I highly recommend the book, especially to read a current, Bible-based, passionate but not the wrong sort of pushy take on why head coverings are right. You may read it and be convinced.

All that said, I still think there is a difference between the principle (which does not depend on any particular culture and obligates the conscience) and the symbol (which may take a variety of forms depending on the culture), a difference I am working to explain in my preaching. The author addresses this as a possible interpretation, but he did not convince me about the necessity of the particular symbol (cloth head covering).

Though I disagree on the bottom line, it is still a 5 of 5 stars book on the subject.

Worldview Guide for The Iliad

4 of 5 stars to Worldview Guide for The Iliad by Louis Markos

I attended a couple talks by Louis Markos at the 2017 ACCS National Convention and really appreciated his energy and his knowledge. When I saw that he had written Worldview Guides for Canon Press for The Iliad, The Odyssey, and The Aeneid, and since we’re reading all three of those in Omnibus Tenebras, I ordered them immediately. After reading his guide on The Iliad I’m glad I did. It wasn’t like CliffsNotes, but it was very brief with info about key characters, plot points, and a Christian perspective on the story.

The Iliad

4 of 5 stars to The Iliad by Homer

Impressive. Tedious.
Creative. Exhausting.
Poetic. Painful.
Polytheistic. Godless.

Read again with the Omnibus Tenebras class in 2018. I’m increasing my rating from 3 stars to 4 because, even though it is looooooong, I can appreciate its status as a classic.


2015: This is an impressive piece of work, whichever Homer wrote it.