Mud Pies in Our Pockets

The prophet Jeremiah wrote that the universe gasps at the evils of men who seek satisfaction in hand-dug, dirty, broken cisterns that can hold no water when the fountain of living waters is not only full and fresh, it is available.

C.S. Lewis wrote that God does not find our desires too strong but rather too weak. We are far too easily pleased. Like kids making mud pies in the slum we miss a vacation at the sea. We’re pleased with broken cisterns.

Albert Einstein said that “doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results” is the definition of insanity. It’s insane to think our thirst will be satisfied from broken cisterns this time.

As God’s people, we need not be surprised that our hearts are hungry because we pursue bread for our bellies more than for our hearts. We are happy being distracted by digital mud pies in our pockets and wonder why we aren’t enjoying the ocean of God’s truth. We seek self all week long and then wonder why the questions in our small groups seem pokey or why Lord’s day worship seems cumbersome.

It’s crazy to think that we will get different results, spending our summer days in all the same ways, sticking our heads down in all the same cisterns. Our desires are too weak and it is not because God has become less desirable.

Laugh Track

On laughing as responsible leadership:

For this is what it means to be a king: to be first in every desperate attack and last in every desperate retreat, and when there’s hunger in the land (as must be now and then in bad years) to wear finer clothes and laugh louder over a scantier meal than any man in your land.

—King Lune in The Horse and His Boy by C.S. Lewis

On laughing as hard humility:

[K]ings in their heavy gold and the proud in their robes of purple will all of their nature sink downwards, for pride cannot rise to levity or levitation. Pride is the downward drag of all things into an easy solemnity. One “settles down” into a sort of selfish seriousness; but one has to rise to a gay self-forgetfulness….It is really a natural trend or lapse into taking one’s self gravely, because it is the easiest thing to do….For solemnity flows out of men naturally; but laughter is a leap. It is easy to be heavy: hard to be light.

—G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy

On laughing as Calvinist worship:

If, therefore, when thou hast fled, thou art taken, be not offended at God or man: not at God, for thou art his servant, thy life and thy all are his; not at man, for he is but God’s rod, and is ordained, in this, to do thee good. Hast thou escaped? Laugh. Art thou taken? Laugh. I mean, be pleased which way soever things shall go, for that the scales are still in God’s hand.

—John Bunyan, Seasonable Counsel