Categories
Rightly Dividing

Types of Treasures

I’m here for your grammatical-meditation-edification again with a block diagram in English as well as a line-diagram in Greek for Romans 2:5-11. This is another one of those not whether but which issues, and the storehouses are eternal.

Categories
Rightly Dividing

I’ll Be the Judge of That

I really do get that not only does not everyone judge line-diagramming to be as fun and fruitful as I do, most grok even less with the Greek. So last week I went back and added a block diagram in English, and this week I’m leading with it. There’s even some overlap with colors, which, might help show the connections, but you can judge for yourself.

Categories
Rightly Dividing

Out of Their Minds

I haven’t posted any of my line diagramming in a while. In fact, since the previous one, I’ve finished studying/preaching through Revelation and am now into Romans. But this is still more unveiling, not of God’s eschatological/telos wrath, but of abandoning/trajectory wrath.

Here is the final paragraph of Romans 1, showing not only the cognitive bias men have against acknowledging God, but also the cultural disobedience that He gives them over to.

Here is a block diagram in English that attempts to show some of the same dependencies and relationships.

Categories
Rightly Dividing

The Obedience of Faith

The obedience of faith may be one of the most underrated and underused expressions in the Scriptures. It’s only used twice, once in Paul’s greeting to the Romans (Romans 1:5) and again in the benediction of Romans (Romans 16:26), but we should use it more often.

There are a couple proposed interpretations for the phrase.

One possibility is that πίστεως (“of faith”) is a genitive of apposition, where the genitive restates the same idea as in the main noun, or what’s sometimes called an epexegetical genitive, where the genitive clarifies the meaning of the head noun. If that’s the case, the Paul’s mission was to bring about “obedience, that is, faith,” so that obedience is a larger category of which faith is a more specific kind. That interpretation could work. It’s at least theologically correct, and could be compared to John 6:29 where Jesus called faith a work of God (to be done). And since “believe” is an imperative (Mark 1:15), faith would be obedience to the command.

But πίστεως seems to me to better fit the pattern of the genitive of source (or genitive of production). Pauls’ mission was to bring about “obedience derived from or sourced in faith,” or even with the gloss, “obedience produced by faith.”

When I think about the flow of the letter, with the emphasis on justification by faith followed by Paul’s immediate response to anticipated arguments about faith and grace denying the obligations of obedience, especially in chapters 5 and 6, it causes me to lean toward the interpretation of the (necessary) obedience that comes from faith.

I also take Paul’s quote from Habakkuk about the righteous living by faith (Habakkuk 2:4 in Romans 1:17) to refer to faith-driven righteous behavior, not just faith-received justification, though it has to start there.

The Great Commission requires that disciples be taught to “observe all that (Jesus) commanded” (Matthew 28:19). This means that complete obedience to the Lord is the mission, though we understand such a life starts with faith in Him.

We are forgiven by grace alone through faith alone, and then re-formed, still by grace through faith. But this re-formed obedience is a post-requisite. We are being transformed (Romans 12:1), we are being conformed to the image of His Son (Romans 8:29). This is sanctification. Our resurrection in Christ causes us to “walk in newness of life” (Romans 6:4), and sometimes we need to have the feet of our hearts washed again (see John 13:10). The whole thing is from faith to faith (Romans 1:17), and obedience is the fruit of healthy faith.

Faith is no more an enemy of works than the sun is an enemy to flowers. Obedience is the bloom, the color, the fragrance of salvation in the flesh. It is the obedience of faith.

Categories
Rightly Dividing

On the Wings of a Great Eagle

The last time I shared a diagram was at the end of February, which was right before all the COVID-19 lockdown-pandemonium broke loose. Does this post mean things are back to normal? Well, is the dragon, that ancient serpent, any more happy?

So as we wait for the return of the King and His rewarding of the small and great saints who fear His name (Revelation 11:17-18), here’s my diagram for Revelation 12:13-18 (note: most English translations include verse 18 as part of verse 17).

Categories
Rightly Dividing

Ripe Vengeance

The fifth seal in Revelation 6:9-11 is quite different from the first four, with attention on resting until the vengeance of the Lord is ripe.

Categories
Rightly Dividing

The Four Horsemen

Here’s the diagram for Revelation 6:1-8, as the Lamb breaks the first four seals and the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse are called to ride on earth in judgment.

Categories
Rightly Dividing

You Would Say Amen, Too

Here’s the diagram for Revelation 5:11-14, as worship of the One who sits on the throne and of the Lamb widens to include all creatures.

Categories
Rightly Dividing

A Lamb Standing

When John turned to see the Lion, instead he saw a Lamb, standing as though it had been slain. He was worthy to take the scroll. Here’s the diagram for the central paragraph in the chapter, Revelation 5:6-10.

Categories
Rightly Dividing

Weep No More

John’s vision of the heavenly throneroom moves to a focus on the one who is worthy to open the scroll in Revelation 5:1-5.