On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness

5 of 5 stars to On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness by Andrew Peterson

I’m sure there was a day when I would not have enjoyed this book at all. TODAY IS NOT THAT DAY! I thought the names were playful and many of the footnotes were fun (I’ve always wondered how to make booger gruel) and I care about what happens to the Igibys. I’d start rereading it tomorrow if there weren’t three more books in the Saga.

The Last Battle

5 of 5 stars to The Last Battle by C. S. Lewis

2019: I had to do it, I’m now giving 5 of 5 stars. I reread it because I’m talking about it at our upcoming Fiction Festival, and enjoyed it more than ever.


2018: (4 of 5 stars) There is one page in this book that is the worst. The rest of it creates the right kind of longing to fight, and if necessary die, for Aslan. There is a better home where we belong.


2010: Alright, again, I enjoyed the fiction. What is this world coming to?

Also, I choked up a couple times especially near the end.

The Bacchae and Other Plays

3 of 5 stars to The Bacchae and Other Plays by Euripides

2015: We only read The Bacchae (not the “and Other Plays”) but I quite enjoyed it. My pleasure wasn’t in the idolatry, or the madness, or the savagery, but rather the opportunity to celebrate how the Triune God of the Bible is so much more glorious than Dionysius and how He provides true, everlasting joy. Our Lord gives rather than takes, He shares His glory rather than hoards it, He gives wine to gladden hearts rather than deaden hearts, and He forgives the repentant rather than punish all without mercy. This play also makes Lewis’ inclusion of Bacchus as a servant of Aslan in Prince Caspian no small coup.


2019: Read again for Omnibus Tenebras.

You Who? Why You Matter and How to Deal with It

5 of 5 stars to You Who? Why You Matter and How to Deal with It by Rachel Jankovic

How could I not give 5 of 5 stars to a book dedicated to my wife?!

To Morgan, a faithful lighthouse on that higher rock.

It is, though, in light of the dedication, sort of ironic that Rachel has an entire chapter against personality tests, while Mo enjoys them, and I’d say uses the insights she gets from them with great wisdom and charity.

I think the review by my oldest daughter and by my friend, Leila, are also helpful.

Though I’m not a woman, and have never wanted to identify as a woman, I am married to one, am a dad to three young ladies, and help shepherd a flock with many females who definitely will benefit from this book.

It Doesn’t Have to Be Crazy at Work

3 of 5 stars to It Doesn’t Have to Be Crazy at Work by Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson

I liked 37signals from the start. I’ve used Backpack and Highrise and Basecamp, now their primary product and the company’s name. This book had some quite reasonable recommendations for not letting work become god (my words, not theirs). For more, see my wife’s helpful review.

Fiction Up and Fiction In

I mentioned in my previous post that our next Raggant Fiction Festival is coming up in a couple weeks, March 23rd to be precise. This year’s theme revolves around The Chronicles of Narnia and other things Lewisian, and you can get tickets through March 18th. A ticket gets you a great lunch, some other goodies, and opportunity to hear the following talks:

  • Leila Bowers – Sleuthing Stories: How Narnia Teaches Us To Slay Sneaky Dragons
  • Bekah Merkle – The Nobility of the Common: American Aristocracy in Narnia
  • Jonathan Sarr – What is Bacchus Doing in Narnia? Feasting, Revelry, and Making an Ice Queen Sweat
  • Myself – The Adventure That Aslan Sends or, The Last Lesson to Fortify Children With Chests
  • Bekah Merkle – Loyalty and Treachery: Virtues, Vices, and Victories

Alsan invites you to come