A Moral Pebble in Your Shoe

Rather than appreciate collateral blessings, our unbelieving culture would rather maneuver Christians off the hill of blessing altogether. More than that, they want us to feel guilty about the good we have. The right way for us to respond, which we’re discouraged from doing by the ones without the good, is to boast more. This requires a little fleshing out, and it’s not something that can be done properly in the flesh.

Here’s an example. A university professor claims that a mom and dad who read to their kids give their kids an unfair advantage of “familial relationship goods.” He said, “I don’t think parents reading their children bedtime stories should constantly have in their minds the way that they are unfairly disadvantaging other people’s children, but I think they should have that thought occasionally.” So it might not be the worst thing ever, but it’s still a moral pebble in your shoe.

There are many other and less laughable and more pervasive examples. You should feel guilty for having so much food when others are starving. You should feel guilty for buying and wearing clothes that others can’t afford. You should feel guilty for having White (skin) Privilege. You should feel guilty for not being a woman, or identifying as one, or however that works.

Really, you should be feel guilty for being a Christian. Saying you have a Savior implies that others need to be saved, and that’s rude. Saying Jesus is the Savior is exclusive and not tolerant. You hater. Don’t enjoy something that others can’t, let alone something that offends them.

Some men do puff themselves up, look down on others, treat others with contempt and injustice. Some do abuse their privileges and cause real hurt, so said Solomon in Ecclesiastes 8:9.

But when we remember the gospel, the word of the cross, the sovereign grace of God, we will not feel guilty for receiving these things from Him as gifts. Jesus is our wisdom, our justification, our purpose, our life (1 Corinthians 1:30). In God’s kindness He gives marriages and kids and food and clothes and gender and generational, systemic fruitfulness. So let us keep on bragging in the Lord (1 Corinthians 1:31). To do otherwise is to displease Him.