The Kuyperian Vision of Christ’s Lordship

The Kuyperian Vision of Christ’s Lordship ➔

I can’t remember being as excited about anything that wasn’t divinely inspired in a while. Though I’m always on the lookout for new audio to listen to while running, very few things make me want to run longer and faster. The following did. Two days in a row. I can’t recommend it too highly. I’ve already ordered the biography that is mentioned multiple times and plan to start reading it as soon as it arrives.

Go download this address from George Grant at the 2007 ACCS conference. Really. Then listen. Three or four times.

But, be careful. It just might get you fired up to “run toward the roar.”

The Kuyperian Vision of Christ’s Lordship

I can’t remember being as excited about anything that wasn’t divinely inspired in a while. Though I’m always on the lookout for new audio to listen to while running, very few things make me want to run longer and faster. The following did. Two days in a row. I can’t recommend it too highly. I’ve already ordered the biography that is mentioned multiple times and plan to start reading it as soon as it arrives.

Go download this address from George Grant at the 2007 ACCS conference. Really. Then listen. Three or four times.

But, be careful. It just might get you fired up to “run toward the roar.”

Fathers Who Give Hope

Fathers Who Give Hope

I listen to this sermon from John Piper regularly. The message comes from Colossians 3:12-21, especially verse 21:

Fathers, do not provoke your children, lest they become discouraged. (ESV)

His outline is:

  1. The Address – “Fathers”
  2. The Command – “Do not provoke your children”
  3. The Purpose – “lest they become discouraged”

Paul requires Christians to rear children who are not discouraged. Initially, that requires rearing children away from hope in money, health, a spouse, or self (all of which will disappoint), and instead toward hope in God.

Fathers bear the unique burden of giving hope to their kids, though not independent of their wives. We ought to lead our sons and daughters in such a way that they would see the heavenly Father through our dim reflection.

Perhaps the most daunting, and encouraging, counsel is that what we are as fathers is what our children will become. Giving hope is not a program, it is primarily about living and growing as hope-filled Christians.

That is the first thing that fathers can do to provoke their children to long-term discouragement and hopelessness—they can fail to BE hopeful, happy, and confident in God.

Don’t Blow It

Don’t Blow It!


Or, The Almost Inevitable Ruin of Every Minister and How to Avoid It, a message by Don Whitney to pastors and church leaders at the 2007 Omaha Bible Church conference.





I recommended this message earlier in the week, but it’s worth a post as well. Whitney begins:

Almost every minister knows another minister, if not several, you don’t want to be like. But the sad news is that regardless of your age or education or experience it is almost inevitable that you will become the kind of minister, elder, or leader, that today, you don’t want to be.

We’ll be ruined, or we’ll quit. Regarding the alarming stats about how many pastors quit pastoring, he observes that many will:

opt out for health reasons,
wash out in their private lives,
bow out realizing they misread the call of God,
bail out because of the stress being so great,
be forced out by their churches,
walk out from a sense of frustration and failure.

Still in the introduction, Whitney says:

Terrible things still happen…to ministers and ruin them. And there is an almost inevitable ruin of every minister. And it will happen to you, unless you avoid ruin by making progress. How do you make progress in the ministry instead of shipwreck?

To answer the question he heads to one of the most influential passages in the pastoral epistles, 1 Timothy 4:15-16. I’ve been marinating much in this passage since 2003 and recommend Whitney’s treatment.

Hyper-busyness

Six Lessons in Prayer


This highly-recommended message is by Alexander Strauch, originally preached during chapel at The Master’s Seminary on April 16, 2009.

Strauch addresses the (pastoral) idol of hyper-busyness, and how that challenges the apostolic priorities in Acts 6:4: “We will devote ourselves to prayer and the ministry of the word.”

From Ephesians 6:18-19, Strauch admonishes pastors to:

  1. Always be creative in your praying: “all prayer and supplication.” Avoid the rut.
  2. Always be praying in a spirit of prayer: “praying at all times.” Emphasis on the frequency, thanking always, confessing regularly, seeking always.
  3. Always be praying in the power of the Spirit: “praying … in the Spirit.”
  4. Always be watching and praying. Emphasis on effort and perseverance: “keep alert with all perseverance.”
  5. Always be praying for others: “making supplication for all the saints.” See also 1 Samuel 12:23
  6. Always be praying for missionaries and the gospel: “to proclaim the mystery of the gospel.”

Faith by Hearing

Mo gifted me with my first iPod on my 30th birthday in 2004. Not only I have moved out of Music Naysayer Neighborhood since then, but more importantly, I have eaten up countless hours of solid food while legging it on my treadmill. A couple years ago I listed a few of my favorite online audio resources and, now with Grace to You making all their audio available for free, it seemed like a good time to update those links.

*While searching for some Augustinian material1 back in January, I also stumbled across a new-to-me, fantastic audio resources site with a fitting name, Faith by Hearing.

Faith by Hearing is designed to collect and categorize the ever-growing availability of great Reformed and conservative evangelical audio preaching & teaching that has a high view of God and Scripture.

You can read more about the site here. While I very much recommend subscribing, the on-site categorization is really quite useful. Browse by biblical book, by doctrine, by history, by person/preacher, by topic, or by venue. As long as you have an internet connection, not even a lion in the road can keep you from feasting on this sermon smorgasbord.


  1. Google dropped me off at the Augustine of Hippo Series by Steve Lawson.