Categories
Lord's Day Liturgy

Witnessing Songs

We take worship in song seriously. Singing is not the only act of worship, but the bones of praise move best with the muscles of melody held in by the skin of songs.

What happens when we learn and sing good songs of worship? The body is encouraged, yes. But the body is also made more accountable.

In Deuteronomy 31 the Lord told Moses that his days of leading Israel were almost finished. The remaining task the Lord gave to Moses was to “write this song and teach it to the people of Israel. Put it in their mouths….” The “Song of Moses” takes up 43 verses in chapter 32 and is harmonized in Revelation 15:3 with “the song of the Lamb”: “Great and amazing are your deeds, O Lord God the Almighty! Just and true are your ways, O King of the nations!”

But as it provided an outlet for expressing thanks and adoration, the song also provided accountability. “Put [this song] in their mouths, that this song may be a witness for me against the people of Israel” (verse 19). The Lord knew that after the many blessings He would give that they would have “eaten and are full and grown fat, they will turn to other gods and serve them, and despise me” (verse 20).

when many evils and troubles have come upon them, this song shall confront them as a witness (for it will live unforgotten in the mouths of their offspring). (verse 21)

Much is required of those to whom much is given. We have been given the privilege of many psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, and they call us to account for whether we are fearing the Lord and glorifying His name.

Categories
Lord's Day Liturgy

Songs Working Overtime

Advent is a season of anticipation. I’ve given four exhortations to confession for sake of our preparation the previous four Sundays, and, now that we’re here on Christmas day, I’ve got a final imperative: rejoice exceedingly with great joy!

The angel told the shepherds that he brought “good news of great joy that will be for all the people” (Luke 2:10). If we don’t have great joy, then we haven’t believed the good news. And when the wise men came a while after Jesus’ birth, “when they saw the star, they rejoiced exceedingly with great joy” (Matthew 2:10). Surpassing delightedness, not barely not complaining, is the response of those who see the Son of God, the Son of Mary.

One of my favorite lines from our Christmas carols, the line that has provoked my imagination more than others this December, is “let men their songs employ.” It makes me think of a company hired to promote a new cure, or a product certain to please those who get it. The team must consider how to get maximum reach, the most appropriate medium, and utilize their best resources to pull off the announcement.

Here we are to receive and respond and proclaim that His blessings flow far as the curse is found. Earth should receive her King. He rules in truth and grace. What should we get ready in order to rejoice exceedingly with great joy? We need to find some songs and put them to work. It’s going to be a long day for some of these songs, and some of them have been working overtime for a month or so. But the songs can handle it. Joy to the world—Jesus Christ is born to save-let men their songs employ.